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20131202
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
about the welfare for their schools or jobs or civil rights or civil liberties or the stalemate of suspicion suspicion, if that is what they mean by a liberal that i am proud to say i am a liberal. ashes teeeighteen and andrew write in their introduction they helped to kraft the words of this is what i meant to arthur to be liberal. bell letter chronicles historians views through the second the iraq war. u.k. and read letters from the roosevelt, truman, adelaide stevenson, humphrey, a candidate, kissinger, a william f. buckley, jr., the clinton, al gore gorby doll, jacqueline kennedy and naturally with his interest of american history sammy davis, jr., a and mick jagger. [laughter] to a detractor to accused arthur of being a communist sympathizer he said your first letter was a product of misunderstanding for you to really provide if not i can only send you to the nearest psychiatrist. but i should note arthur had a keen appreciation for andrew jackson and jack daniel's. as is also appreciated arthur did not believe white wine was done to the day given the difficulties of the af
, their jobs, their civil rights and civil liberties -- someone who believes we can breakthrough the stalemate and suspicion that grip us in our policies abroad, if that is what they mean by liberal, then i'm proud to say i'm a liberal. as andrew and stephen write in their introduction to their father's letters, arthur schlessinger jr. helped kennedy craft those words. the letters, which are a marvelous book, chronicles the late historian's views really from world war for through the -- world war ii through the second iraq war. you can read letters from adelaide stevenson, john kennedy, robert kennedy, henry kissinger, william f. buckley jr., al gore, gore vidal, jacqueline kennedy and naturally -- given arthur's interest in american history -- groucho marx, sammy davis jr. and bianca jagger. alexandra, arthur's wife, is not here, so we can mention that one. to a detractor who accused arthur of being a communist sympathizer, he wrote: the facts i have cited should relieve your mind. if not, i can only commend you to the nearest sigh psychiatris. [laughter] i should note quickly that arthur had
mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leaders with sabotage and attempting to violently overthrow the government. the winner of 1964, mandela and his colleagues were sentenced to in prison. mandela's brutal imprisonment helped win freedom for his nation.
is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... ...you could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at experian.com america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where pe
that will nelson mandela set. >> want to bring in andrew young, civil rights leader and former ambassador to the united nations. welcome, as well as james joseph, former u.s. ambassador to south africa and duke university professor, both of who new mandela very well on a personal level. ambassador, i'd like to start with you. you draw parallels. you talk about how this was so important, so significant in some ways to the civil rights movement and the struggle at the time. for us, i was a college student when we had a lot of those divest from the from the south africa shantytowns in the yards of the campuses. tell us the connected you had with the civil rights movement. >> understood that as dr. king said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. and so we knew of chief albert la tooley and the african national crisis. we entertained oliver tambo and mbeki when they were in exile. but my first real conflict, i went to south africa with arthur ashe in 1974 to play tennis. we tried to seaman della and didn't but we saw robert subuqwai who had just gotten out of jail and we start
among some of the biggest civil right ises advocates. brown hosted him in his civil rights tour after he got out of prison. >> mandela came here in 1990, and 70,000 packed into the coliseum to see their hero and receive thanks for his activism. >> it is you, the people of the bay area, who have given me and my dedication hopes to continue to prosper. >> the bay area choir who performed for him in south africa
, the profile including funerals for prominent african-americans or commemorations of civil right events of which the clintons have been present. marking the hundredth anniversary of the largest african-american sorority. >> the idea that in the 21st century african-americans would wait in line to vote for ten hours while whites in an affluent precinct next door waited just ten minutes, or that african-americans would receive fliers telling them the wrong time and day to exercise their constitutional rights, that is not the america we expect or the america we want for our children. >> well, in the article in the "new york times" i mentioned, former virginia governor the first elected african-american governor in the country recalled a conversation with bill clinton in may this way. i'd be less than honest, the governor said, if i didn't tell you i came away convinced that there was no question about her running. joy reid is msnbc contributor and eugene robinson columnist at "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst. you're smiling, joy. i think it's for me, but maybe it's about t
brazile is here, nelson mandela, the civil rights movement in the united states, what was going on in south africa, you and i are old enough to remember those days, the role and as christiane accurately points out, that all of us played in trying to move south africa in a better direction. you remember those days very vividly. >> well, the apartheid regime was a brutal regime. it was a violent regime. and the goal of folks in america, especially young people, was to educate, was to mobilize and to get more sanctions, to get corporations doing business in south africa to put pressure on the south african government. clearly it worked, because after years and years of struggle, finally in 1990, we broke the apartheid regime but it was a long and brutal struggle. >> here's a picture, take a look at this. >>> give us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south afri
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from commentary magazine. he said reagan loved it but the secretary of state george schultz was furious at him for putting it in. it made if president look like simpleton. >> but that was a part, anything that could
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
they were supposed to do. and still, yet, they get arrested. >> under federal civil right laws there have been cases in the second circuit that have gone a lot further. if i was a law enforcer, i would think about dismissing charges. >> today, the monroe county district attorney said in a statement after reviewing the facts associated with these arrests, i have decided to dismiss the charges in the interest of justice. joining me now is james peterson, associate professor of english at lehigh university. also an msnbc contributor. this looked like the outcome that had to happen, after our program last night, the mayor of rochester came out against this. i was deliberately on this show last night doing everything i could, including booking dan french, to push this prosecutor back and to push the police back on this arrest. >> that's right, and listen, kudos to you, your show, and your producers for making this national news. we have to give credit where it's due. really important here, lawrence. i'm teaching a class right now in black prison narrative. i'm studying michelle alexander and t
person. the disabled people of america are fighting hard for our civil rights. nelson mandela has done a lot of work things considered for things like slavery. we have a topic similar. you are not entitled to the minimum wage here in america. we are specifically exempt. we are so inspired by the work of nelson mandela, we try to continue in that legacy. we want to make it so that our people, our disabled people, are no longer trapped in these workshops. host: why the blind exempt from the minimum wage? caller: the fair labor standards act of 1938 specifically exempts us. the idea is that disabled people are supposed to be inherently less productive. we are less than people. there are a lot of explanations. some people think they are doing by employing disabled people at a penny an our. it is exploiting us. whenever go on to real productive life. we are pushing hard to try to get that change. we want to be able to earn minimum wage for our work, or not work at all. disabled people have the the cassidy to be -- have the thatity to make the change nelson mandela made. host: thank you for
but reunite once more as 50 red, white, and blue states. as the civil rights leader once reminded us -- "we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we are all in the same boat now." so, my friends, the time has come for the sons and daughters of lincoln and the heirs of jefferson and jackson to no longer wage war upon each other but to instead renew the struggle against the ancient enemies of man -- ignorance, poverty and disease. that is why we are here. that is why. >> he was so disgusted with washington. and, of course, he stayed. and there are all these examples of what he has gone on to do. so, look, it all speaks for itself. i mean, you can -- it's nice that there are commentators who can put a fine a point -- or a finer point on it. but this is all out there. >> chris dodd, former peace corps volunteer. >> chris dodd, very nice guy, very fun-loving guy. i mean, very sort of, you know, outspoken liberal. he was -- he had this great legislative last hurrah in 2010, where he -- you know, he coauthored dodd-frank. he was one of the chief engineers of the health care bill
of politicians, celebrities, civil rights leaders and others who are arriving in south africa to pay their respects to nelson mandela but only a select few got to hitch a ride with the president, including one guy who sat in that big chair before. the ex-presidents club has been called the most exclusive one in the world and they have been depicted as a super group of super heroes by "snl" but what happens in reality when you're stuck on a 19 hour flight with someone who has spent years repudiating everything you stand for? well, actually, it can mean beautiful things. the world is quickly preparing for what may be the largest gathering of heads of state since winston churchill's funeral in 1965. representing the u.s. alone will be presidents barack obama, george w. bush, bill clinton and jimmy carter. comprising one of the most prestigious frequent flyer clubs in the world. today, air force one departed for south africa, where more than 90 world leaders are planning to attend nelson mandela's memorial tuesday in johannesburg. inside air force one, the obamas and george w. and laura
in the civil rights movement the anti-apartheid movement was our opportunity to participate in that way. >> that's so true. we have to leave it there. congresswoman, safe travels. april, thank you for being with me. >> thank you. >>> when question come back, why is it acceptable for a 23-year-old offered $3 billion for an app but $3 billion seems like too much to keep a promise to workers who earned it? workers in an american city. that's coming up. turn to roc® retinol correxion®. one week, fine lines appear to fade. one month, deep wrinkles look smoother. after one year, skin looks ageless. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. take skincare to the next level with new roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1, proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness, lift sagging, diminish the look of dark spots, and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. yes. cup your hands together for me. rub it all the way up your hands. any exposed skin. and get the backs of your hands too. put some just around your neck. [ bell rings ] you're good to go. okay great
include allegations that employees of the department deprived jail prisoners of civil rights, also obstruction of justice allegations. apparent attempts to cover up the truth after it became clear that cases were under investigation. some of the most outlandish alleged behavior started after it became known that an informant in the jail was working with the fbi. the u.s. attorney's office said employees of the sheriff's department went so far as to try to get a judge to release names of everybody involved in the investigation and when that didn't work, allegedly tried to put the squeeze on an fbi agent. >> despite a judge's refusal to issue this order because he had no jurisdiction over the federal agency, two los angeles county sheriff's deputies, sergeants, allegedly confronted an fbi special agent outside her residence in an attempt to intimidate her into providing details about the investigation. >> reporter: now, in the past, sheriff lee bacca has said it was the fbi who was breaking the law and said there was really no attempt to intimidate the fbi agent. it doesn't really so
, this is not right, this cannot stand, we couldn't advance civil rights at home and go through all that we went through, including the martyrdom of martin luther king, who clearly, like gandhi, like mandela, was inspired by gandhi, and not stick up for south africa. >> and you did indeed. he was grateful to you for that. was there one piece of advice that he gave you that really sticks out in your mind? >> yes. when he told me -- he basically was saying, you know if you're in public life and you have public responsibilities, you cannot be free and effective unless you have no personal feelings of anger. he said, you know, you have to -- you have to never give up your mind and heart. it requires a mental and emotional discipline to live in the present and the future, and keep an open door and open mind and an open heart to everyone. i remember one day, oh, about a month after the whole impeachment business was over, henry hyde, who had run the whole show, unbelievably enough, maybe a few months after, it was shortly after, asked for a meeting at the white house, for something that he was interes
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
's about civil rights. >> dave? >> this is the mood certainly in maryland and parts of the you state to be more welcoming, more open, gay marriage, the revolution and thinking on gay people and people who have other issues in that regard -- not issues, but transgenders, people like that. just another move in the direction. hyattsville today could be a lot of other cities tomorrow. >> i tend to agree. i don't think there's -- it's notable that this step has been taken. but unless it leads to a larger, more broader sort of conversation about discrimination generally, it may just be something localized. this is the kind of thing i expect out of tacoma park. surprised that hyatts vilville took -- >> i like people that call it park. >> discrimination is discrimination. >> dave mcconnell, jerry. thank you for being with us. i'm pat lawson muse. that's it for reporter's notebook. news 4 today continues. >>> we're keeping close watch on a winter storm. a live look over the potomac river right now at 6:30, courtesy of our camera at national harbor. even though it's along the water, it's one o
of guerrilla leaders in civil wars anywhere who just hate the opposition, right? you see that in syria today but he managed not to let that pull him down but to just focus on changing the system and not hating the people. jon: tom carver covered the end of apartheid in south africa for the bcc. he talked to nelson mandela a couple of types. tom, thank you for sharing those thoughts. >> you're welcome. >> some new details emerging from the investigation into the tragic death of paul walker. police now making an arrest in what they say that these two men stole from the scene of the crash and how they found out about it. we'll get you up-to-date on that. >>> also the white house says the obamacare website now works for most americans. why problems with the site can lead to a nasty surprise for some people who think they signed up for insurance. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. througall of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in t
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)